Category: Life + Style

9 Podcasts to Listen To

By dweb247 on September 14th 2020

Something that continues to bring us together – WFH be damned! – is swapping Netflix recs, must-read books, new album reviews, and of course, podcasts. Since September 30th is National Podcast Day, here’s our list of the best podcasts to listen to this fall… or you know, forever.

Song Exploder

Music lovers, rejoice! Song Exploder is a podcast where musicians take apart their songs, and piece by piece, tell the story of how they were made. Produced and edited by host Hrishikesh Hirway, this podcast is a love letter to music. Each episode is a deep dive into the creative process that went into crafting a great song, straight from the artists themselves. Episode 150, Fleetwood Mac’s Go Your Own Way is a classic, but you really can’t go wrong.

The NYT Daily

20 minute episodes that dig into one topic that’s dominating the headlines. Produced by The New York Times and told by journalists and subject matter experts (and excellent host, Michael Barbaro whom we’d love to get a slice of pizza with). Knowledge is power, so stay in the know. New episodes Monday – Friday, ready by 6am EST.

Outside/In

Stuck inside or just yearning for wide open spaces, this podcast focuses on the natural word and how we use it. With solid reporting and long-form storytelling, host Sam Evans-Brown draws you in from the first words (he’s a former environmental reporter). You don’t have to be a whitewater kayaker, an obsessive composter, or a conservation biologist to love Outside/In.

You Must Remember This

Miss heading to the movies? Listen to this podcast about the first century of Hollywood filmmaking. It’s a fascinating take on the glamor, glitz, and grit that built the silver screen scene over the decades.

1619

This short podcast series is a must listen for all. This 2019 audio series from The New York Times was produced for the 400th anniversary of the beginning of American slavery. The 6-episode series, hosted Nikole Hannah-Jones, examines the long shadow of that first salve cargo that landed in Virginia in 1619 – and examines how historical oppression and systemic racism has affected the Black experience in America since.

Gastropod

If you love food, history, and science, you’ll love Gastropod. Recommended by Helena – our resident Podcast Queen – she loves Gastropod for its “cool food facts.” Ever wonder about the underbelly of the lobster industry? Or the real origins of pizza? Or what the most dangerous fruit in America is? (It’s the watermelon, FYI). Grab a snack and take a listen – “Dinner plate invasion” is Helena’s fave.

Code Switch

Named after the phenomenon of mixing languages and dialects depending on the context, the Code Switch podcast cranks out informative episodes about race, ethnicity, culture, and how they play out in our lives and communities. New episodes are updated weekly and hosted by Gene Demby and Shereen Marisol Maraji. It’s a great way to listen to various perspectives on current events.

Pre-Loved Podcast

We love anything about the circular economy. This podcast is a weekly interview about rad vintage style with guests you’ll want to go thrifting with. Hosted by Emily Stochl, episodes cover style, running a fashion business, sustainability, slow fashion, the stories behind incredible vintage pieces, and why second-hand is the best hand.

Bear Brook

We couldn’t write a podcast recommendation list without a binge-worthy true crime podcast. This one comes from New Hampshire Public Radio and it’s a decades-long mystery that follows the twists and turns of a serial killer. It’s a cold case that calls into question human nature and criminal justice system. Someone call Olivia Benson!

Girls’ Night in 2020

By dweb247 on September 14th 2020

From Black Lives Matter to COVID pandemic to hurricanes and heatwaves, 2020 has us rethinking everything – birthday parties, office culture, grocery shopping, book clubs – and the latest change up is Girls’ Night. September 22 is National Girls’ Night (who knew?), so here’s our take on girls’ night – 2020 style.

Virtual Book Club

Diversity of thought is part of what makes humans (and women!) such a unique species. And when it comes to books, there’s no shortage of different perspectivse. So bring together your book worms and pick books that purposefully offer a different perspective. Read books by women from other countries, or books by women with different upbringings and backgrounds. If books are too much of a commitment, round-table a recent article that you all read. You’ll be surprised – even in conversation with your closest friends – just how much you didn’t know.

Socially Distant Happy Hours

If you’re in town – BYOB, bundle up, and get back to the days of picnicking. Parks, beaches, backyards, bonfires, campsites… there’s no limit (other than the general 6 foot distance).

Recipe Exchange

Part of what makes us unique are the traditions we get passed down from generation to generation, so share that with your friends. Host a Zoom cooking night each month where someone else is a “host” – they’ll walk everyone through a recipe that takes 30 mins or less to prepare. Everyone is in their own kitchen, with their own ingredients following along. Now’s your chance to let your inner Samin Nosrat shine! (Bonus: when you’re at home, no need for a DD).

Yes, It’s Okay to Talk Politics

Dialogue is where progress happens. If you are passionate about a cause or a candidate, gather your girlfriends and give them a rundown on why this is important to you. Let them know succinctly (in 5 mins or less) why you are passionate about a particular cause, then give them the floor to ask questions and offer counter opinions. Pro-tip when it comes to talking about politics and policy: Let people know how the issue personally affects YOU or your community. Be realistic – you can’t be passionate about everything, so don’t come out hearts a ‘blazing for every issue and every candidate. Stick to the things you are truly passionate about, 1 or 2 issues max (schedule another Girl’s night if there are more). It will be easier for others to see your perspective if you can keep it focused, keep your cool, and be open to hearing others. Dialogue, FTW!

Phone Banking & Letter Writing

Let’s say you and your friends support the same candidate or cause; you can skip the discussion and go right to grassroots campaigning. Give your girls’ night an activism twist and organize a letter writing night or an afternoon of phone banking (yes, wine is a fine accompaniment to both). It might feel awkward at first (and definitely uncommon for a girls’ night) but helping a cause will make you feel like a million bucks.

Food or Toy Drive

With shorter days and the holidays just around the corner, it’s a perfect time to start planning a food or toy drive with your friends. Spend your next girls night talking about logistics and get a goal and a plan together for how you can pool your resources and make a positive impact on your community. Pro Tip: Have your friends reach out to their co-workers to multiply the impact!

Plan a Girl’s Trip for 2021

2020 was the year of canceled plans. So get a girls’ trip on the calendar for next year. It can be the trip of your dreams (sailing around Greece, anyone?), a 3-day backpacking trip in your local mountains, or just a staycation at your place (or whomever has a dishwasher). Either way, when it’s safe to hug and laugh and lounge and play in close proximity again, grab the chance and soak it all in.

How to Host an Outdoor Movie Night

By dweb247 on July 21st 2020

Light the citronella candles, pop the corn, and use the cooler as a footstool – it’s an old-fashioned outdoor movie night! And since staying in is the new going out, this is the perfect summer to whip up the backyard (or side yard or front porch or driveway) cinema that you’ve always dreamed of. Here’s our tips for how to host a (socially distant) outdoor movie night for any budget.

Step 1. Pick a spot

If you have a plain white wall that’s flat, you’re in business and skip to step #3. If not, find a spot where you can set some chairs up – you’ll want to be at least 8 feet away (depending on where your projector is). Next, consider if you are hanging a screen or if you are using a screen on a stand. That will determine if you need any hardware to make your screen.

Step 2. Make a screen

There are a ton of ways to make a screen depending on your budget, time, and desire to use power tools. But the one thing that all screens need – regardless of means or mode – is to be pulled taut. There are a few ways you can do this:

  • Get an old, white sheet or shower curtain and use some heavy-duty double side tape (a LOT of it) to pull and stick the edges of your fabric to the surface. This method is temporary and only works with lightweight fabric, but it’s just about as thrifty as they come!
  • If you’re using something more heavy duty like a white canvas or drop cloth, cut a small hole in the top left and right corners and hook onto some nails or S-hooks. To pull it taut, fold the bottom of the fabric in and sew a small pocket with open hole on either end. Run a wood dowel or curtain rod through the tube pocket to weigh down the screen.
  • If you’re up for a trip to the hardware store, you can build a 100” frame for under $50 and a few hours of DIY. You’ll need a few 1 x 4 plywood beams, a handful of nails, a staple gun, and white blackout cloth. Think of it as a giant painter’s canvas. Here’s a good YouTube tutorial we’ve used before.

Step 3. Hook up an A/V system

Like the screen set up, there are about a zillion ways that you can hook up an A/V system depending on your budget, desired lumens, and whether or not you NEED to watch Jurassic Park in surround sound. You can buy projectors from anywhere up to $5,000 or a $50 mini projector that hooks up to your cell phone.

Do your research and figure out which one is right for your budget and needs. If you’re just testing the waters, ask around and see if anyone has one you can borrow for the night. If you do buy one, we recommend shopping local. And even if it’s a big chain store, shopping at the local branch keeps jobs in your community and your carbon footprint lower!

Also, don’t forget about the sound! Some projectors have a built-in speaker, but we suggest plugging in an amp or a speaker to get the full effect! Who wants to listen to listen to American Graffiti out of a rinky-dink speaker? Not us.

Step 4. Pop the corn

Seriously, what’s the point of a movie night with no popcorn? Save the microwave stuff for the winter and pop the kernels over some high heat. Toss it with all the yums.

  • Plain old butter and salt
  • Sugar, salt, oil of choice (aka DIY Kettle Corn)
  • Brewer’s yeast and coconut oil
  • Olive oil, dried herbs and garlic salt

Step 5. Invite some friends

Or keep it just your family – up to you. Invite friends and neighbors (assuming you have 6 feet of space to spare between friends) and tell them to BYO blankets and chairs. Extra air fives if they add something to the cooler.

Step 6. Pick a Movie

The reason for the season. A few of our summer favorites…

The Goonies – The classic

Coming to America – For the grown-up movie night

Step into Liquid – When you’re dreaming of waves

Searching for Sugar Man – Good tunes, great story

Dirty Dancing – Gives “family vacation” a whole new meaning

Dazed and Confused – We get older, this movie stays the same age

Sister Act – Gospel music meets the mob. Make it a double feature with Sister Act II

The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert – Don’t forget your heels

DEET vs. Insect Shield

By dweb247 on June 7th 2020

Nothing says summer quite like the bloodsucking buzz of the mosquito. And it’s not just the mosquitos — the ticks, midges, no-see-ums, ants and other creepy crawlers are just as relentless. Luckily, we humans have developed various bug repellent tactics to combat Mother Nature’s most annoying pests: lighting citronella candles, burning sage, dousing ourselves in DEET, rubbing picardin lotion all over, and our favorite, Insect Shield Technology woven right into our clothing. Before we get into why we love Insect Sheild protected clothing, let’s dive into the alternatives.

What is DEET?

DEET (or diethyltoluamide), is the most common active ingredient in insect repellents. It was actually developed by the U.S. Army in 1946 to protect soldiers in insect-infested areas, and a few years later it hit consumer shelves.

DEET works by basically taking you off of a bug’s radar. Insects can sense people and animals by detecting the air that we breathe out. DEET masks the smell and thus makes it harder for insects to find you. Sounds harmless enough, but the issue with DEET lies in the chemistry.

The compounds that make up DEET are toxic when absorbed or ingested into the human body – it’s a pesticide, after all. And if you’re rubbing or spraying DEET onto your skin, the chances to absorb are high. Though it’s not been proven by the FDA to cause cancer, DEET has been linked to skin irritation, redness, rashes, and swelling. And DEET actually stays in the body for a long time. DEET absorbed through your skin can be found in the blood up to 12 hours after it is applied. Once it’s in your body, DEET travels through the liver where it’s broken down into smaller chemicals, and finally exits through the urine. Most DEET has left your body within 24-hours of application.Because DEET is so widely used, it has been found in wastewater — and in places where waste water becomes part of the environment.

So let’s talk about the effects of DEET on the environment. First of all, DEET does not dissolve or mix with dater very well, so it needs. To be broken down by other chemical processes – even natural ones. When DEET gets into the soil it will stick to the soil unless it can be broken down by microbes, like bacteria and fungi. Like the human kidney, these microbes just break the chemicals down into smaller compounds without actually “removing” it. Like most pesticides, once it’s out in the world, it stays there. Think of it like plastic. The same thing happend when DEET is sprayed or evaporates: it will be in the air as a vapor and then begin to break down slowly in the atmosphere.

The producers of DEET have spent a lot of money trying to say that it’s not toxic, or that it’s safe for kids. But as parents and environmentalists ourselves, we don’t buy it. To be on the safe side, we avoid DEET sprays and DEET mosquito repellents and look for alternatives that do not absorb into the skin or the environment.

What is Insect Shield Technology?

The DEET alternative that we like is Insect Shield Technology that utilizes permethrin (per-meth-er-in). Permethrin has been successfully used in the United States as an U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-registered product since 1977, with an excellent safety record. It is used in lice shampoos for children, flea dips for dogs, and various other products, some of which are regulated by the FDA. The Insect Shield process binds a permethrin formula tightly to fabric fibers which result in effective, odorless, permethrin-treated clothingfor insect protection that lasts the expected lifetime of apparel.

And best of all, it does NOT absorb into the skin. Insect Shield Repellent Apparel puts insect repellency near your skin, instead of on it, and the protection is invisible. Also, the repellency is long lasting, so no re-application is needed.

Permethrin treated Insect Shield® Repellent clothing has been proven and registered to repel mosquitoes, ticks, ants, flies, chiggers, and midges (no-see-ums). Insect Shield® Repellent Gear has been proven and registered to repel mosquitoes, ticks, fleas, and flies. The EPA requires extensive effectiveness data to prove a product’s ability to repel insects. Many species and varieties of these insects have been tested, including those that can carry dangerous diseases.

Permethrin treated clothing is not toxic to dogs or cats, and is safe for kids and toddlers – though we recommend monitoring your kids closely when you use any new products. Insect Shield Technology has been deemed safe by the EPA and has actually been used in millions of uniforms for US Military as well as in millions of permethrin-treated bed nets that are distributed globally via malaria control programs.

Check out more on Insect Shield Technologyand shop our Debug Collections for safe, permethrin clothing for men and women.

How To: Natural Tie Dye

By cwiesendanger on May 11th 2020

As optimists to the core, we are always trying to find the bright spots and silver linings in every situation—no matter how tough. We recently asked our customers what their bright spots were during this global pandemic, and here’s a common thread we kept hearing: Having more time to slow down.

Slowing down comes in many forms, but a lot of you mentioned having extra time for projects, hobbies, family, and making more sustainable choices. So we thought this would be a great time to talk about one of our favorite slow-down, sustainable activities: How to make natural dyes from food scraps (aka tie dye your clothes in the most eco-friendly way).

Using natural dyes to spruce up old clothes is a double win for sustainability: It’s an awesome way to breathe new life into old threads to save them from the landfills—and using food scraps to make the dye is an awesome (and fun) way to make use of your waste in the kitchen. You can use all types of food scraps like avocado pits, walnut shells, and beet tops, but for these instructions, we’re going with two of our favorite natural dye ingredients: onion skins and used coffee grounds.

And a big thanks and shout out to our friend Emma for sharing this step by step guide with us—she’s a textile artist launching her own upcycled clothing line, so yeah, she’s an expert (more on her below).

What you’ll need

  • •Cotton T-Shirt (organic cotton or bust)
  • •Yellow onion skins and/or coffee grounds (two of the best natural dyes)
  • •Rubber bands
  • •A non-reactive pot (stainless steel or enamel work well)
  • •Iron mordant (optional) **

 

What is a mordant?

When dyeing clothes naturally, a mordant is needed to fix your dye to your fabric—otherwise the colors will quickly wash out and fade. Iron (ferrous sulfate) is a a commonly used mordant that “fixes” and “saddens” your colors. It’s one of my favorites and can turn golds to olives and browns right before your eyes! If you’re wondering about natural dyes that don’t need mordant, onions are a great choice. Some plants (like onions) are very high in tannins (a naturally occurring mordant), and do not need additional mordanting with iron or other metallic salts. For this project, you’ll only need a mordant (and some extra lead time) if you choose to dye your clothes with coffee grounds.

To make a mordant at home:

  1. 1. Put a handful of rusty nails in a jar.
  2. 2. Fill jar with 2 parts water + 1 part white vinegar.
  3. 3. Cover and set aside until the solution turns orangey (1-2 weeks).

 

To dye your clothes:

  1. 1. Throw your tees in the wash with a pH neutral detergent (most “sensitive skin” detergents fit the bill). When they’re nice and clean, soak them in a pot of water for at least an hour, but ideally overnight.

 

 

  1. 2. Meanwhile, put your dye supplies (coffee grounds or onion skins) in a non-reactive pot, adding just enough water to cover your shirts. Bring the water to a boil and simmer (for at least an hour, but overnight if you can). For this project, I used about 10 onions worth of skin for one shirt and a half gallon bag of used coffee grounds for a second shirt (1 shirt per dye pot). It’s possible to continue dyeing with the dye pots until the color is “exhausted” (aka producing really, really light colors). You can also adjust the amount of natural ingredients to get your colors darker or lighter.

 

 

  1. 3. After your shirts have soaked, you can bind them into tie dye patterns.

 

For a bullseye pattern, pinch the center of the shirt and wrap rubber bands at regular intervals all the way down.

 

For a spiral pattern, pinch the center of your shirt and twist. Once it’s fully twisted, rubber band it in “slices.”

 

  1. 4. Strain the dye materials out of your pot, drop in your shirts, and simmer for an hour. Let cool and rinse.

 

 

  1. 5. If you’re using an iron mordant, now’s the time. Simmer 1 cup of your iron solution with water for 30 minutes (make sure you use enough water so that your shirts will be fully covered once you submerge them). Remove the solution from heat and dip or submerge your shirts – iron works quickly so this may only take a few minutes. Rinse out.

 

  1. 6. Hang to dry in a shady spot, then wash your shirts with a pH neutral detergent again.

 

 

  1. 7. Get excited to wear your new naturally dyed tees!

 

**A few safety notes: As a general rule, it’s best not to use any pots or utensils for food after they’ve been used for dyeing. If using an iron mordant, keep solution out of reach of children and pets; avoid breathing steam from an iron bath and simmer in a well-ventilated area. Iron mordant can be safely disposed of down the drain in municipal areas.

 

Once you’ve gotten this technique down, it’s easy to learn how to make natural dyes from plants and other food scraps—and the world is your oyster when it comes to things to dye. Think pillowcases, dish towels, cloth for wrapping gifts (a favorite sustainable trick—get instructions here). When sustainability meets creativity, everyone wins.

Emma Fern is a textile artist living in Burlington, Vermont. Inspired by the stories and traditions of her Appalachian ancestors, she calls upon the sustainability of age-old techniques like natural dyeing to create contemporary textiles. She’s launching her upcycled clothing line, CNTR, this summer. Follow along on Instagram @cntrcntr.