Category: Sustainability

Clothes are Holes: How To Fix Different Types of Holes in Clothing

By tsemow on March 19th 2020

We’ve all felt the sting of a fresh rupture in one our most beloved garments. As Stanley Yelnats learns in Holes (a Toad favorite), “the first hole is the hardest.” But no matter how big or small, a hole doesn’t mean that your favorite wardrobe piece is forever relegated to laundry day and late night frozen yogurt runs (or worse – the landfill). If there was anything to learn from the wisdom of Sachar’s coming to age masterpiece, it’s to live in the moment and take each hole as it comes.

That’s why we’ve assembled this quick and easy video guide on how to repair a tear in fabric of all types:

How to fix a hole in a sweater elbow:

How to fix a hole in the inner thigh of jeans:

How to fix a big hole in a shirt:

How to fix a hole in leggings:

How to fix an iron burn hole:

How to fix a hole in a down jacket:

How to fix a hole in a sock:

Because when you really think about it, “clothes are actually just holes.”

 

And if you’re looking for repairs that go well beyond holes, check out our how-to guide on sewing buttons, hemming pants by hand, and more.

We’re all about whatever it takes to keep clothing out of the landfills. And if that means sending your clothes to someone else to repair, we’re OK with that too. Learn more about how this works through our partnership with Renewal Workshop.

8 Ways to Save Water

By cwiesendanger on March 17th 2020

March 22 is World Water Day, which aims to bring light to the water effects of climate change—and how everyone has a role to play in using it more efficiently. With that, here are our top Toad tips for saving that precious H20.

1. Do less laundry. We’ve always said “Dirty is the new clean” (seriously, just check out the hang tag on our new clothes). But when it does come time to freshen up, run full loads and make sure to skip the extra rinse cycle.

2. Reuse. Water that you’ve boiled pasta or veggies in is a great option for hydrating your indoor and outdoor plants! You can also make a big difference by capturing water while you wait for it to heat.

3. Grow native plants. If you’re looking to start a garden, we always recommend going native. Native plants are already perfectly accustomed to their environment, so they require less water than bringing in more traditional landscapes and lawns. They’re low maintenance, attract birds, butterflies, and other wildlife, and promote local biodiversity.

4. Take shorter showers. Easy peasy (you can also install shower heads that are designed to conserve water).

5. Run full loads only. Same tip from your washing machine applies to your dishwasher. And if you don’t have a dishwasher, double check that that faucet’s turned off as you rinse (bonus: if you have a dual sink, fill one side with hot soapy water for washing, and one with cold, clear water for rinsing).

6. Check for leaks. A slow drip from a leaking faucet can waste as much as 20 gallons of water per day. And a leaky toilet can waste 200 gallons per day (Pro tip: put food coloring in your toilet tank. If it seeps into the bowl without flushing, you’ve got a leak)!

7. Cover your pool. It reduces evaporation and can cut the amount of replacement water needed by 30 – 50%.

8. Wear organic cotton. Organic cotton uses far less water than conventional cotton to grow—and it often uses “green water” (which comes from rainwater) versus “blue water” (which is pumped in from lakes, glaciers, and snow). Shop Men’s and Women’s organic cotton clothes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

What is Organic Cotton Clothing?

By dweb247 on March 13th 2020

We get a lot of questions about organic cotton clothing, sustainable fabrics, and natural fibers. They’re all interconnected, but for all our fellow fabric nerds here’s our roundup of most frequently asked questions.

What does “organic clothing” mean?

From the veggies in your fridge to the clothes in your closet, crops grown organically are grown with GMO-free seed and follow practices that maintain soil health, conserve water, and support biodiversity. So organic clothing is apparel made from organically grown fibers.

Is cotton clothing sustainable? Is organic cotton better?

When it comes to organic cotton vs. cotton, the difference is in the production. Conventional cotton uses 15% of the world’s pesticides. Certified organic cotton farming forbids the use of toxic chemicals, pesticides and GMOS. So yeah, organic cotton is much better for farmers, consumers, and all living things. Our organic cotton clothing is made from cotton grown in Turkey, India, and China. For us to use it, it must be GOTS or OCS certified.

What is organic cotton fabric?

Let’s lay out some basic organic cotton facts: Non-GMO, no pesticides, low-water crop. Organic cotton starts with non-GMO (genetically modified organisms) seed that’s grown without toxic chemicals, pesticides, or pollutants that can be harmful to farmers and ecosystems. Organic cotton is grown predominantly with rainwater instead of irrigated water. If it meets these criteria, cotton is certified organic. 100% of our cotton is either certified organic or recycled.

How does organic cotton conserve water?

Organic cotton uses far less water, and often uses a more sustainable kind of water called “green water.” Green water uses rainwater instead of irrigation (versus “blue water,” which is pumped in from lakes, streams, glaciers, and snow). Overall, organic cotton uses88% less waterthan conventional cotton to grow.

Is organic cotton softer?

We like to think so, but there’s really no difference in hand feel. The only way to know if something is made with organic cotton is to read the fabric details tag inside the garment.

Convinced? Shop Men’s organic cotton clothing and Women’s organic cotton clothing.

How to Fix Your Clothes

By dweb247 on February 6th 2020

We’ve said it once and we’ll say it again: clothes don’t belong in landfills. Wear it out, or pass it on. We’re big fans of using what you’ve got and mending your clothes when they’re a little worse for the wear.

A good rule of thumb is to buy durable, well crafted clothes that won’t fall apart after a few wears and washings. Next, follow the wash instructions – most things last longer when washed in cold water and air dried. When you come across something that needs mending or altering, roll up your sleeves and get to work. Here’s how to fix your clothes, so no excuses!

How to Sew a Button

How to Hem Pants By Hand

How to Cut a Raw Hem

How to Mend a Seam

How to Fix a Broken Zipper

How to Repair a Hole in a Sweater

How to Repair Your Jeans

How to Fix a Hole in a T-Shirt

How to Hem on a Sewing Machine

Polybags Suck

By cwiesendanger on January 30th 2020

Polybags suck. Something we can all agree on, right?

We hate plastic as much as you do. But the prevalence of the notorious polybag is a reality we face in the clothing industry. That little bag your clothes showed up in is key to keeping them safe from damage during transit, warehousing, and shipping. Without them, much of the product would arrive damaged and then comes the big, bad L word (aka it ends up in a landfill).

We are always working to make the best decisions for the environment and for our customers, and – real talk – the polybag that each garment is wrapped in is currently our biggest challenge.

Here’s what we’re doing to address it.

  • •Since the beginning, we’ve made our polybags from recycled plastic.
  • •A few years ago, we audited our bags to reduce the amount of plastic used. We made the bags as thin as we possibly could and reduced the overall average size.
  • •We removed the individual polybags completely from all shipments of samples sent to HQ – and are working with other key partners to ship their products without polybags.
  • •We’re currently in the middle of another audit that will lead to less, and even smaller, polybags in future seasons.
  • •We’re constantly thinking creatively about how to get a second or third life from the bags. We moved the little ventilation holes up to the top of the bag so that it can be reused as a doggy pick-up bag or for your dirty clothes on a weekend getaway (keep reading for more on that).

 

But what about alternatives?

The short answer: The current alternative options just don’t match up to our sustainability requirements. And there isn’t enough research yet to prove that alternative options are actually better.

Here’s the long answer: Believe it or not, alternative materials (like compostable plastic) are often not as awesome as they sound. Most compostable plastics (this goes for cups and silverware too) can only be composted in industrial compost facilities, which are rare in the U.S. And even if they make it as far as an industrial composter, they take much longer to break down than the true organic waste. What does this mean?

  • •This can end up causing issues like slowing down the turnover of the facility by causing employees to pull out the compostable plastics to put them back in with the next load of organic waste. Sometimes this takes 5-6 cycles before the plastic is fully broken down!
  • •Often the compostable plastics are thrown into the recycle stream where they can ruin processing machines, so in most places the presence of compostable plastics often cause the whole batch of recycling to be sent to the landfill.
  • •Even when the compostable plastics do fully break down, their presence can degrade the rest of the compost in the batch because they break down into a sticky, resin-y mess. This creates poor compost that’s not rich or nutritious for plants (like compost from truly organic materials is).

 

We promise to keep an eye on alternatives and are constantly evaluating how they stack up to what we’re currently doing. And while we’re always working to REDUCE the amount of plastic, here are some ideas for how you can REUSE the bags in the meantime.

  • 1) Dog poop bag. Done and done.
  • 2) Store your phone, wallet, and keys when hiking in the rain. Keep bags on hand to cover your muddy shoes before you get back into your car.
  • 3) A simple starter pot for plants: Fold down the bag until it’s as tall as you want the soil to be, poke a few holes in the bottom, fill with soil, and plant your seeds.
  • 4) Scoop cat litter with leftover bags or use one to line the litter box.
  • 5) Hang a cedar closet bag (fill a bag with cedar chips, tie it closed, then poke several small holes in the bottom with a safety pin) to repel moths. Or fill the bag with flower petals, crushed fragrant leaves, and a couple of drops of aromatic oil for an easy DIY sachet to freshen up musty drawers.
  • 6) Fill a bag with distilled white vinegar (a couple of inches below the vent holes), then tie it around your showerhead to remove soap scum and mildew.
  • 7) Cover fragile plants with plastic bags if you detect frost on the way. Same goes for outdoor padlocks in the winter to keep them from freezing.
  • 8) Replace bubble wrap with plastic bags when mailing packages. You can use the same trick when packing away breakable holiday decorations.
  • 9) Use the plastic to stuff winter boots or bags you don’t use in the summer to help them keep their shape.
  • 10) Put plastic bags under furniture you’re painting. They also work great for protecting tables and counters when kiddos are doing craft projects.

 

And of course, we’re always looking for other ways to cut back on waste, like by making clothes from recycled plastic and offering reusable shippers. Because just like you, every step we take counts!